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Taken 1-Aug-20
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Keywords:#SVPhotography, #TorontoPhotographer, Avro Lancasters, Event Photographer, News Photographer, Planes, SVPhotography.ca, Toronto Event Photographer, Toronto Photographer
Photo Info

Dimensions6739 x 4493
Original file size4.07 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken1-Aug-20 13:33
Date modified15-Aug-20 13:52
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D850
Focal length500 mm
Focal length (35mm)500 mm
Max lens aperturef/5.7
Exposure1/250 at f/5.6
FlashNot fired
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 100
Metering modeSpot
Avro Lancaster

Avro Lancaster

The Museum's Lancaster Mk. X was built at Victory Aircraft, Malton in July 1945 and was later converted to a RCAF 10MR configuration. In 1952, it suffered a serious accident and received a replacement wing centre section from a Lancaster that had flown in combat over Germany. It served as a maritime patrol aircraft, with No. 405 Squadron, Greenwood, NS and No. 107 Rescue Unit, Torbay, Newfoundland for many years and was retired from the RCAF in late 1963. With help from the Sulley Foundation in 1977, it was acquired from the Royal Canadian Legion in Goderich, Ontario, where it had been on outside display. Eleven years passed before it was completely restored and flew again on September 24, 1988. The Lancaster is dedicated to the memory of P/O Andrew Mynarski and is referred to as the “Mynarski Memorial Lancaster”. It is painted in the colours of his aircraft KB726 – VR-A, which flew with RCAF No. 419 "Moose" Squadron. Andrew Mynarski won the Victoria Cross, the Commonwealth’s highest award for gallantry, on June 13, 1944, when his Lancaster was shot down in flames, by a German night fighter. As the bomber fell, he attempted to free the tail gunner trapped in the rear turret of the blazing and out of control aircraft. The tail gunner miraculously survived the crash and lived to tell the story, but sadly Andrew Mynarski died from his severe burns.